Welding Schools in New Hampshire | NH

While most New Hampshire residents are seeing the last dregs of the 2008 recession, there are still many people in the Granite State that are unemployed. Welding as a trade is one that will be in demand for the foreseeable future. Entering this industry could be a good way to cement your occupational future for the long run. This article will reveal everything you need to know about welding training programs in New Hampshire.

Requirements & Eligibility

To enroll in a New Hampshire welding school, there will usually be some prerequisites that you have to meet. For example, if you sign up for a welding certificate program at a community college, you may have to meet certain high school GPA requirements and/or have successfully completed some specified high school coursework.

But most people who wish to enroll in a welding degree class should be able to do so if they meet the following requirements:

  • Earned a high school diploma or GED (general equivalency diploma)
  • Be able to speak and understand English
  • Be 18 years of age or older at the time you enroll in a certification class

Application Process & Costs

In the state of New Hampshire, application fees for welding degree classes can vary widely. While the application fees for welding certification programs such as the ones at White Mountains Community College (Berlin) and Manchester Community College can be as low as $20, this does not include the other costs that come with enrolling at a community college training class. These other costs can include equipment and technology fees, the price of a student ID and books, or additional tuition expenses for students who are not official New Hampshire residents.

The University of New Hampshire’s main campus has an Associate of Applied Science in Civil Technology, which includes welding classes. The application fee for that program is $50.

Online Programs

Currently there are no welding training classes that are conducted entirely online. The art of welding is a hands-on affair, so it would be extremely difficult to convey all the nuances of this work in an online environment. If you enroll in a welding course from a community college or as part of the Civil Technology curriculum at the University of New Hampshire, you will probably get the chance to take online courses in other subjects. If you do your training at a trade school, you will have to take all of your classes in a live classroom environment.

Maintaining Certification/License & Renewal

To become certified as a welder in New Hampshire, one must complete a correct weld for a supervisor who is vetted by the American Welding Society (AWS). Once a welder gets their certification, they must maintain their current standing by turning in a maintenance form to the AWS every 6 months.

Salary & Job Prospects

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, welders in the U.S. make about $36,300 a year. The median hourly pay for welders in 2012 was $17.45. The good news for folks in New Hampshire is that welders in that U.S. state have a slightly rosier employment future. In May of 2014, New Hampshire welders made, on average, $42,000. Their median hourly wage was $20.15. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that the welding industry will grow at a rate of about 6 percent within the next ten years.

Before you sign up for that first welding class, make sure that your potential schools fulfill standards set forth by the AWS, that they offer financial aid, and train you in pertinent areas such as pipe welding, shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding and gas tungsten arc welding.

The post Welding Schools in New Hampshire | NH appeared first on Welding Schools Guide.

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