Welding Schools in New Mexico | NM

Looking for a career in a field relatively sheltered from the effects of a rising and falling national economy? Welding has been called an “evergreen profession,” meaning that demand for qualified welders tends to stay consistent even in difficult economic times. What’s even better is that seeking out your welding training in New Mexico offers many programs and opportunities that are hard to come by, only serving to increase your marketability as a professional. Take a look at what welding education programs in New Mexico have to offer!

Requirements & Eligibility

Welding programs usually don’t require anything beyond a high school diploma or its equivalent. This is good news for those looking to enter the field – it means you tend not to have to seek out any more expensive education before getting started in your welding career. You should be in relatively good shape, because welding can involve being in awkward positions for long periods of time, but beyond that there are few requirements for eligibility.

Application Process & Costs

Get in touch with the specific program you’re looking at to learn more about their application process and costs. For exampla, the Dona Ana Community College welding program, which offers hard to come by classes like orbital TIG welding (a skill set highly in demand these days), has several phone numbers and email addresses to reach the admissions department and inquire about specifics.

Tuition also varies from program to program, but financial aid is available at most institutions. Again, get in touch with the admissions or financial aid offices at your desired college to learn more.

Online Programs

Welding is an extremely hands-on profession and is not, therefore, a good candidate for online classes – you should plan on spending just about all of your time in a classroom or shop setting when you’re learning the welding trade. If your program has any general education requirements, they may be able to be completed online, but you should expect not to be able to obtain a welding certification just through online programs.

Maintaining Certification/License & Renewal

The more varied your skills are and the more up to date your methods and certifications, the more marketable you’ll be as a welder. While every industry and company has its own ways of running day to day business, knowledge and capability in a wide variety of welding styles is a definite asset in the field. If you’re already working in welding but want to expand your horizons, take a look at welding programs in New Mexico – for example, the Dona Ana Community College program mentioned earlier, or the certification program at Clovis Community College.

Salary & Job Prospects

The median salary of welders in 2012 was $36,300 per year, making the profession very suitable for someone looking to start or support a family. Welding as a field experiences relatively slow growth as a whole, but it is an area that is consistently hiring and one that welding college graduates report little trouble finding a job in. If your skills are specialized or certified in unusual areas of welding, you’ll probably be a better candidate for potential employers – consider the benefits of looking into less common areas of welding.

Welding classes in New Mexico are an excellent way to lay the foundation and continue education in a dependable and sturdy career field. Browse what programs are available to you and reach out to admissions departments with questions – they’re happy to help and you’ll quickly find yourself seeing the benefits of starting or refining your education in the welding world.

The post Welding Schools in New Mexico | NM appeared first on Welding Schools Guide.

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